Hamilton: DreamCast

By Regina Sienra and Donna Lowe

Hamilton (Definitely not the city in Ontario. The big musical that made Broadway cool again) has broken records, indeed, but one of its biggest achievements is bringing rap and hip hop to new audiences who may not have seen its potential as a marvellous and diverse art form.

Despite its very American story – the musical depicts the United States’ Founding Fathers after all– people from all over the world have been mesmerized by the music and the spirit of Hamilton. Of course, that includes Canada.

Inspired by the rumours about a Toronto production opening sometime in the near future, the success of the Original Cast Recording — the album hit #1 on the Billboard Rap chart, only to be dethroned by Drake’s Views — and K’naan attending the show and hanging with the show’s creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, we decided to created our dream cast of Hamilton with amazing Canadian rappers and singers. A show with a cast this stacked could get even the most vociferous opponent of musical theatre onboard.

Buck65 Photo by DeaShoot Used under CC license.)
Buck65. (Photo by DeaShoot used under CC license)

Buck 65 as Alexander Hamilton. The musical’s namesake was a prolific, yarn-spinning, ambitious, creative force. Hamilton hustled his way from Caribbean orphan to US Treasury Secretary and right-hand man to George Washington. Rich Terfry, the rapper/storyteller/CBC host from Mount Uniacke, N.S., seems like a logical choice to fill this Founding Father’s shoes.

 

 

Shad Photo by ECostello)
Shad (Photo by ECostello at English Wikipedia)

Shad as Aaron Burr. In contrast to Hamilton’s impulsiveness, his rival Aaron Burr was cautious, reflective, and measured — while equally intelligent — and Shad has the serious demeanour that seems to be needed for the role. The London, Ont., rapper has a long career in spot-on, strong rhymes, and his new project has brought further proof of his vocal ability, which is needed for big numbers like “The Room Where it Happens.”

 

 

Basia Bulat Photo by John Benson.)
Basia Bulat (Photo by John Benson)

Basia Bulat as Eliza Schuyler Hamilton. Lin-Manuel Miranda has described Eliza’s role as “pure goodness,” and projecting that is something Basia Bulat does with ease. Her beautiful and haunting voice, added to her powerful performances, fit Eliza’s emotionally-charged songs perfectly. Just listen to “Burn” from the Original Cast Recording and Bulat’s “It can’t be you” one after the other and you’ll see what we mean.

k-os Photo by Kevin Brereton)
k-os (Photo by Kevin Brereton)

k-os as Marquis de Lafayette / Thomas Jefferson. This dual role requires a big personality — someone with rapid-fire rap skills, charisma to burn, and an instant aura of respect onstage. Who better than k-os, who has fearlessly spoken truths about being a rap artist in Canada since 1993.

 

 

Cadence Weapon Photo by Martin Cathrae)
Cadence Weapon (Photo by Martin Cathrae )

Cadence Weapon as George Washington. The trailblazing poet laureate from Edmonton recently wrote for The Guardian about the adversities and the hope of putting hip-hop in the spotlight, which in the beginning meant defying the stereotype of Canadian identity. With a career that spans more than a decade, Cadence Weapon has become an authority — you might say even a “presidential” voice — not only in Canadian rap, but anywhere.

Kinnie Starr Photo by David Carroll
Kinnie Starr (Photo by David Carroll)

Kinnie Starr as Angelica Schuyler. Powerful, smart, sensible. Those are some of the adjectives that describe Angelica, the oldest of the Schuyler sisters, and they’re equally appropriate to describe Kinnie Starr. The Calgary singer who mixes hip hop and rock in her music is very vocal about her Aboriginal heritage and her political stances. She never backs down, and neither does Angelica.

 

Luke Lalonde Photo by ElfieTakesPictures cropped and used under CC license)
Luke Lalonde (Photo by ElfieTakesPictures cropped and used under CC license)

Luke Lalonde (Born Ruffians) as King George III. With a cameo performance that doesn’t even hit the 10-minute mark, the sassy King George nonetheless makes audiences laugh their heads off by taking himself way too seriously — leading to nothing being serious at all. This character gets three 60s-like, Beatles-esque pop songs, and Luke Lalonde would deliver them extraordinarily well.

 

 

Def3
Def3 (Photo from bandcamp)

Def3 as John Laurens/Philip Hamilton. The Saskatchewan rapper has a fresh and youthful sound, just like these two characters — Laurens is Hamilton’s friend and confidante in Act 1, and the same actor plays his son Philip in Act 2. Def3’s Latin American ancestry and the bundle of “charisma and good looks” make this choice even more fitting.

 

 

Odario
Odario Williams (Photo from Twitter)

Odario Williams (Grand Analog) as Hercules Mulligan/James Madison. This double role has “sidekick” qualities — in Act 1, Hercules is one of Hamilton’s entourage and in Act 2, Madison is Jefferson’s right-hand man, but to reduce these parts to the sidelines is unfair. Both parts require versatility, a broad skill set, and the talent to own a name that you can’t imagine without, as Miranda told The Rolling Stone, “picturing Busta Rhymes saying it.” We think Odario is up to the task.

Lindi Ortega Photo by Stanthemanchan)
Lindi Ortega (Photo by Stanthemanchan)

Lindi Ortega as Peggy Schuyler/Maria Reynolds. The powerful Jasmine Cephas-Jones – who also plays two roles during the show, as do many other cast members – truly shines in the part of the plot-shaker Maria Reynolds. The sexy character who seduces Hamilton (resulting in America’s first sex scandal!) really requires a sexy performer, and Lindi Ortega would not only provide a marvellous interpretation, but she would also offer new perspectives to the soul/R&B-influenced score.

 

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160 thoughts on “Hamilton: DreamCast

  1. tiffy, that’s the terrible part about really nice vacations: the return to “real life”. Condoleances, but mitigated… ;s)

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  2. Thanks @BFO – I’m actually feeling quite re energized and ready to take on the MASSIVE project that I have just been given.

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  3. Good morning!
    Home County was great.
    Craig is doing well.
    Stevie is a hell of a guitar player.
    I know ONE Northern Pikes song.
    There’s a new brewery in London called Toboggan Brewing and our favourite pizza place is in the same building.

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  4. Good morning!
    I would definitely go to this Cancon version of Hamilton. Can someone make this happen please.

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  5. CDNz1 6:11, thanks for the report. good to hear SRK and Sir Craigory are doing well, did you also see Teebs?

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  6. Not asked nastily (’cause I don’t care, or mind, really): How fast is Pokemon Go going to become ‘so last year’?

    Sub-questions: What’s the next one going to be, and (more to the point) how soon? Are ‘augmented reality games’ going to be the next be money sucking segment of the western economies?

    No need for any answers, but speculation is invited.

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  7. It’s hard for me to imagine a CanCon musical without Hawksley Workman or Allie X (nee Hughes). Not to make this about me, but I once made a mix disc musical featuring the two of them in the lead roles, though I think that Shane Nelken really stole the show.

    I suppose I just totally made that about me. In my defense, I’m really interesting.

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  8. ftr, Hawksley was my first choice to play Alexander Hamilton, but we decided we’d try to limit it (as much as possible) to artists with at least some hiphop leanings (Basia aside, but she just seemed undeniably perfect for that role).

    On another note: WAPUCHE!

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  9. For those who are not familiar with the cast recording, let me show you one of the songs that, I think, embodies this… giving a fresh, contemporary face to this historical characters. By doing that, lots of people have felt again (or for the first time) that history belongs to them. Lin-Manuel Miranda uses the phrase “A story of America then, told by America now”.

    (Cross your fingers. Maybe I’ll make the Spotify thing work this time)

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  10. On what Benoit said about Pokemon, I wouldn’t be surprised if it was found “so last year” in a month, even less. I don’t expect it to have a super long life on the top, but I’ll defend what it has done for a lot of people. I spent the entire weekend playing it with my boyfriend, we discovered cool bits of our neighbourhoods, we talked to other people, had a good laugh and made a lot of exercise!

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  11. Re: Pokemon Go – we have a world map shower curtain and this morning Port Moresby caught my eye, and I remember that I first learned it was the capital of Papua New Guinea when I was playing Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? as a kid so I’m hoping that Pokemon Go is also educating people as they play. It seems like a great idea to me.

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  12. @Samara Hi! Thanks! Were you familiar with this musical? Also, I think it’s great for educating and discovering too! I think almost half of the stops in my city have to do with catholicism, and most of them being “urban shrines”

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  13. Boy, really quiet here!

    Peggy and I went to the California State Fair yesterday, and unlike what it’s usually like in Sacramento in July, it was really nice with only a high of 85º – instead of the usual 100º plus.

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  14. @Mcfflyer Today’s topic! Hamilton –as in, Alexander Hamilton, the Founding Father–, did you know about it? Have you noticed any surge in history fans or anything?

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  15. @Reg – Oh. I haven’t paid any attention to Hamilton, so I have to opinion to share. Sorry. But quite the blog post today!

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  16. @Reg – well, since my last history class I took was … umm … 48 years ago, I haven’t been following along too closely. 🙂

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  17. Ya, it’d be interesting to know what you guys learn about Hamilton in school. In Canada (at least in my part of it) we learned…absolutely nothing.

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  18. @Mcfflyer Those guys have been dead for 200 years, so one would expect you got at least hear from them.

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  19. mcflyer: it’s probably safe to say that the latest update re: Alexander Hamilton in the last 48 years is that some guy wrote a musical about it.

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  20. @Reg – Of course I know who Alexander Hamilton was. But let’s just say that my sphere of interest doesn’t really include early American history, especially since I live in California that wasn’t part of it. Now, however, if I lived back in New England somewhere, perhaps there would be more reason to be involved with American history of that time period. Now, if you want to talk about the gold discoveries in California and the subsequent Gold Rush, well, that’s more “local” to me.

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  21. Samara: they normally use prop muskets during that number, but since the Tony Awards took place the day after the Orlando shooting they opted to perform without them. A good move, I think.

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  22. @loweeda interesting trivia tidbit, thanks. I’m going to watch it again with that in mind… and I agree, I think it was a wise decision to go without muskets for that performance as it may just have detracted from the audience’s experience, given the timing.

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  23. So your answer Lee is that yes Americans do learn about Hamilton in their history classes? Because as loweeda mentioned, we learn nothing about him in Canada that I recall.

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  24. (Dang Spotify)
    I had no clue about Alexander Hamilton until I checked out the musical. I knew about George Washington, and a guy named Jefferson… but that was about it.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. @ Darb – Yes, of course we do – we learn about the formation and early days of the country. But again, that was a long time ago for me, and I don’t remember the specifics! And I never did take an American history course when I was in university.

    However, I don’t remember anything ever taught about the history or geography of Canada every taught in school!

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  26. reginula: I was about the same re Hamilton (I actually thought he was a president at first–oops!).

    I wish we learned more in school about the history of countries that aren’t our own, actually, or about other parts of the country we do live in. I think it’s actually a little echo-chamber-y to just be learning about where we live and nowhere else–especially in a world that contains the internet.

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  27. @Donna Indeed! Wish we were taught about other countries’ history too. I don’t know if it’s an issue up there (I wonder) but it would be pretty controversial here (WHY ARE YOU TEACHING KIDS ABOUT US HISTORY YOU ASPIRATIONAL LITTLE SHITS ONLY PLOTTING TO SELL OUR COUNTRY TO THEM, or something like that), but for example, our Independence process from Spain happened almost at the same time as South American countries and it wasn’t until long ago that I learned the important names from their independence. I don’t even know how it unfolded. Maybe it’s a nationalism thing?

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  28. Hi all! I have to say I had a lovely weekend and I hope you did too.

    I did see many people out playing Pokemon Go and gathering and even talking to each other. I plan on taking Devin out with my phone this week to check it out. Anyone know if it will work on an old iPad?

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  29. @Loweeda Let me know if you need any help! 😀 The are cool Aztec emperors who wrote poetry, long-ish Independence war, an Austrian emperor who had a terrible time, a revolution that wasn’t exactly revolutionary…

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  30. I am terrible with history and geography. I don’t remember most of what was taught to me. Strangely these are the subjects Devin seems to excel at.

    @Lee – I was aware Americans don’t learn much about anyone other than themselves. :p

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  31. Also, can anyone recommend a good Canadian History book? Or any important chapters I have to check out on Wiki? I once borrowed Canadian History for Dummies from the library. Not kidding at all.

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  32. reginula, it’s absolutely a blind, natural tendency to talk about oneself, one’s history, etc. We went even further in Canada: When I was young (and it’s probably still the case now, to an extent), I learned in French-language schools, in Ontario and in Québec — and so “my” version of Canadian history was slanted towards the French (-Canadians) and against the English — eventually the English Canadians, after the French defeat (English victory) on the Plains of Abraham.

    In other words, the history I was taught was very different from the version of the same taught in English schools.

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  33. @Darbs I’ll look that up! I think I did see someone with an iPad. I had SO MUCH FUN playing Pokemon GO this weekend. I went to a big park on Sunday and there were hundreds of people playing. I got like 50 pokemon in a day, including several I didn’t have. I think there’ll even be a big event this weekend here.

    Also, I’m very curious where are the PokeStops in Regina!

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  34. @Benoit That’s interesting. And I haven’t really checked the Plains of Abraham chapter.

    (Isn’t the Festival d’eté there? Did I spell that correctly?)

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  35. @reginula – I found it wonderful seeing all those people out catching Pokemon. The dude finds it disturbing for some reason. It freaks him out or something. Haha! Devin and I will check it out without him. I have heard that O’Hanlons and Artful Dodger are stops or something. I will let you know what I discover.

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  36. @Benoit – I found so many French Canadians very bitter towards us English Canadians. It being taught them from a young age could be part of it. As a kid from the prairies being clueless, I was quite shocked when I lived in Quebec in my Katimavik days.

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  37. I think the whole Pokemon Go thing is hilarious and delightful. I’m tempted to play, but I don’t think there will be many Pokemon out here in the country so I will just enjoy from the sidelines. Go Pokemon Go!

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  38. @Darbs That’s awesome. If I were them –I don’t know if the Artful Dodger serves food or drinks, but maybe O’Hanlons– I’d make some “We’ll put a lure at lunch time, come have drinks and catch some Pokemon”. It’d be so much fun! I’m wondering it Leopold’s is a stop too. A WILD MEMBER OF YOUR FAVOURITE BAND APPEARS.

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  39. @Samara I hear the country has a lot of Pokemon, they like water and parks. You can give a try if you’re too curious, you may be surprised!

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  40. darbar, as things happened, Québec modernised quite late (starting in the early Sixties); consequently, up until quite late also, Fifties and Sixties, the “old order” still survived in Québec — franco priests and politicians and lawyers, sure, but most of the population not very educated, and most of the businesses and enterprises owned and operated by Anglos. Used to be you could hardly become even a foreman if you didn’t speak English. Or not get served in French at Simpson,s in Montreal.

    So in the Sixties, Québec kids had grown up with parents who spoke of “les maudits Anglais” — the historic “English” having slipped unnoticed into meaning “English Canadians”. And that kind of stuff tends to be persistent in “underclasses”, such as Francos were in Québec, until the nationalisation (= provicialisation) of electricity was done (early Sixties, once more), and bunches of Anglos started leaving a province that was increasingly unfriendly to them. Which was true, and it remains true even now, though to a lesser extent.

    Bit of a bummer couple of parags, those. So it goes.

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  41. One thing I’ve used to learn History are a series of books called Dear Canada. They are fictional diaries of ~12 year old girls telling about a big historic event. So far I’ve read the Halifax Explosion one, the Frank, AB slide, one about an English family that moves to SK, one about Confederation and one about a Canadian girl on the Titanic.

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  42. History books are written by the victors. In my experience of NZ school, that meant a favourable view of colonialism and a general ‘whitewashing’. I try to keep an open mind. I’m reading and listening and learning all the time.

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  43. I read something recently that Canadian history will include more First Nations history and residential schools. I hope it doesn’t get “whitewashed” too.

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  44. It makes sense Benoit. I was just so unaware and still am really. More of that privileged ignorance?

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  45. The thing is that a “real” — an intensive — history class isn’t for everyone. But it would take a superclass to do what I think would make history make more sense: recount history in parallel, from the point of views of (for instance) the English, the French, the Spanish, and yea, North-American natives*; and the Chinese, and Africans (sorry Africa, I know I’m giving you short shrift) etc. Sort of the History of the World, done in perhaps 100 year tranches.

    It would be a hell of a class, and it should be made “more” available — you can reread bits online — but no-one would have to remember dates or names, though some would stick. (But no fucking “dates” exams!) It’d be all about learning about the evolution of the world.

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  46. darbar, nonono, don’t self-flagellate! In Canada the cultural divide persists, matter o’fact there are also the regional divides, where BC bands are almost unknown East of the Rockies, etc. etc.

    In our respective “educational” systems, we’ve all (each) been cocooned with those euphemisms that are comfortable for us. And by definition ignorance doesn’t realise that it exists.

    One thing I’ve learned is that we’re (regionally, nationally) so ignorant — self-centred, really — that what we think other cultures think of us is often completely wrong.

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  47. Reginula, the root of any of English Canada’s problems with Québec, and vice-versa, are right here (from the wiki, with my addition in * *):

    The new British rulers of Canada retained and protected most of the property, religious, political, and social culture of the French-speaking habitants, guaranteeing the right of the Canadiens to practice the Catholic faith and to the use of French civil law (now Quebec law) *meaning that the French language remained a language in Québec*, through the Quebec Act of 1774.

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  48. Reg – check out this:
    http://www.thecanadaguide.com/
    This is an ongoing guide written by J. J. McCullough, who is a 32 year old cartoonist and political writer who went to school at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. He’s been working on this guide for years, and I found it very helpful in understanding the political system of Canada, the history of the PMs, and lots of other interesting stuff.

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  49. Took my motorbike for a rip through the neighborhood last night even though I have no mirrors and no functioning tail lights and signals (soon to be rectified) . I live about 20km out of town and figured I’d be cool. Sure enough, I came up to a slow moving RCMP SUV! He was moving real slow and put his signal on and pulled over so that I could pass. I had no choice but to pass so I did and prayed he wouldn’t put his cherries on (not that I would have noticed if he did anyways!) I looked back a few times and turns out I got away this time. Phew!

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  50. One more sentence from the wiki: the root of now-called First Nations (i.e. Status Indians)’ “attachment to the Crown” — o.k., that’s a euphemism that means that First Nations really object to any proposal that the Provinces start being responsible for them.

    I mean they hate The Indian Act (which regulates things quite fundamentally, reg), and don’t really love the Federal Government either, but it’s the devil they know. (Also, there are anglophone First Nations in Québec. They would looooooooove to be forced to deal with a francophone government. Right?)

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  51. Forgot the bit from wiki (12:07)
    “The Royal Proclamation of 1763 had been issued in October, by King George III following Great Britain’s acquisition of French territory.[96] The proclamation organized Great Britain’s new North American empire and stabilized relations between the British Crown and Aboriginal peoples through regulation of trade, settlement, and land purchases on the western frontier.[96”

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  52. what a difference a vowel can make.
    funhog /funhug
    from potential playground nemesis to the (love) life of the festival.

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  53. reg, re your “what went wrong. I start with a quotation from 11:36:

    “and most of the businesses and enterprises owned and operated by Anglos. Used to be you could hardly become even a foreman if you didn’t speak English. Or (edit) get served in French at Simpson’s in Montreal.”

    What that refers to is that the English-speaking dominated the upper class but, more importantly, business and industries in Québec. And the barriers to advancing (for Fr-Can) were akin to racism; speaking English was Speaking White, in a way.

    And when I say “the old order”, I’ve only mentioned a little the priests — really the whole Catholic Church of Rome thing — whose members, unsurprisingly, were part of the French educated classes; and they could talk to the Anglos; so they were cozy in the old situation. In brief, there never was a revolution in Québec, whereas the French (France) had gotten rid of their clergy along with the aristocrats starting in 1789. The US had gone all “fuck you, England”, but Québec, althought they were (mostly) Francos? Nope.

    So come the 1960s and Québec politicians got into the 20th Century, in a manner of speaking, after a long hold on power by the very-aligned-with-the-Church Duplessis government. When the Duplessis government finally fell, lots of things changed quickly because of “the old order” having no clothes, like that emperor; more to the point, French Quebeckers realised that the Québec economy was owned by Anglos, to a large extent, and controlled from Toronto and Westmount (Montreal).

    Things were to change quickly over 10, 20 and 30 years, though not as much as some Québécois had hoped. Still, the Sixties did herald for Québec what was truly “la révolution tranquille”.

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  54. it’s monday … i have been on hold with WCB for 1.5 hours!
    the “music” may just be the end of me.

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  55. yes morgana, hence I did not ride it to work today. Mirrors ordered. Will work on electrical so I have functioning tail lights and signal lights.

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  56. (reg, when you read the wiki, you’ll realise that Canada, Québec, didn’t do nothing, as I sort of describe it above; there are many occurrences over the years.)

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  57. @reginula @ioweeda interesting write up today. you two and all of the others who are keeping this place engaging rock my world!

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  58. Drunk History is awesome, and I’m glad that Nick from New Girl is Aaron Burr even though he’s the bad guy, because he’s my favourite.

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  59. well, they only had so many…
    things i do for money
    girl with a problem
    hopes go astray

    that’s pretty much it, as far as I know

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  60. I’d like to echo morgana’s comment, thank you for this great writing, and the time and effort behind the keyboard to make it so thoughtful and polished. Brava!

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  61. JG,
    been a while. did a run in Waskesiu last weekend, and a short one Tuesday (4 km) and then was at Ness Creek and have done nothing. I’ll get back to it this week.

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  62. @ioweeda… I knew about your slight obsession but hadn’t done the work to actually figure out what it was. But now I know!

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  63. Ness was pretty good. Weather was great.
    the only drag was that the arse-wipe music director arbitrarily decided to switch Danny Michel with the earlier artist, so I showed up and caught his last song. that was annoying

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  64. @krib – That is shitty about missing Danny Michel. He is entertaining. I read his guitar got broken by Air Canada and he had to borrow someone’s guitar for the show. I also saw Shred Kelly post about how great Yukon Blonde was. I am glad the weather held up for you.

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  65. yeah, I was talking to him after the show and he said that. He also said it was totally arbitrary. He just got told at 8:00 PM that he was on instead of at 9:00

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  66. @darbar… I’ve heard a few today on the R3 stream RE Sound Advice. I think near the end of the old site they didn’t bother doing music updates. I am hearing stuff that is new to me today. But now I cannot add them to playlists. :/

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  67. Does anyone know if there still will be R3 podcasts, or not? Or do the weird music rights rules mess with those too?

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  68. I was listening to Spotify earlier and just tuned in. I was wondering if they made some changes this week.

    I am adding songs I hear on R3 that I like to a playlist on Spotify now.

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  69. You know, I remember when just about every band I heard on Radio3, I wanted to learn more about. Where are they from? How long together? How many albums have they put out, or is this their first? Have they toured the States? Have they toured California? Are they going to tour here? But now, thanks to CBC Music’s “We don’t want you here” attitude to outside of Canada, it’s all ended. What’s more, I’ve just about totally fallen out of the orbit of Canadian indie music. But the artists have only one place to blame.

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  70. @mcffyer have you tried following some exR3ers on Spotify? listening to their playlists may get your juices flowing again … reengage you to feel excited about learning about bands again.

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  71. i had a long drive yesterday and needed a distraction; enter podcasts that i have on my iPad. it was fun listening to polaris short list from 2013.

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  72. @morgana, thanks, but I’ve always been a radio person, and playlists don’t quite qualify. I never listened to anyone’s playlists when that was available on Radio3. No, I do believe my time with Canadian indie acts is drawing to a close. Sad and unfortunate, but what brought me here originally no longer exists. All good things, I suppose.

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  73. On the road all day today. To Kingston and back again. Finally a chance to sit down and enjoy a moment of peace and quiet. Thank goodness it’s cooled down, too.

    How are things over here?

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  74. Hey Nick. I’m wondering how much people I converted into Hamiltonism today. Probably a negative amount, but Blimp Rock style, it may be the closest I’ve been!

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  75. Go with the flow. Change with the times. ya da ya da ya da….

    There is something to those cliches. Adapt, adjust, move on. I am finding new music that excites me still and am glad of it. For me it is mostly about the music. The rest is extra special bonus.

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  76. Well thanks to you and loweeda, I am aware of Hamilton’s existence now. The article today taught me more and amused me. There is no way anytime soon that I will be able to see it though so I can’t get too excited about it.

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  77. @mcfflyer partially circumstance and partially your choice then. i agree it is not the same at all and i miss so much about R3 but ourbasement is very informative, entertaining, friendly and not geofenced so …

    Liked by 1 person

  78. @mcfflyer also, i am pretty sure that you have stores of knowledge that you could share about the canadian indie music scene and this could well be great place for you to share some of it with by contributing daily topics/stories.

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  79. @b from o Facebook was just a stepping stone in my mind.
    I would feel ever so more at home here with some orange shag carpet though …

    Like

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